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Motiv Umherirren Stadt Nathaniel Hawthorne. My Kinsman, Major Molineux
Motiv: Umherirren in der Stadt
Aus: Nathaniel Hawthorne. My Kinsman, Major Molineux. In: The Hawthorne Treasury. New York: Modern Library, 1999. S.1087-88
In My Kinsman, Major Molineux sucht der junge Robin seinen Verwandten Major Molineux. Einer längeren Passage, in der er die Stadt absucht, habe ich den folgenden Abschnitt entnommen.
"I say, friend! will you guide me to the house of my kinsman, Major Molineux?"
The watchman made no reply, but turned the corner and was gone; yet Robin seemed to hear the sound of drowsy laughter stealing along the solitary street. At that moment, also, a pleasant titter saluted him from the open window above his head; he looked up, and caught the sparkle of a saucy eye; a round arm beckoned to him, and next he heard light footsteps descending the staircase within. But Robin, being of the household of a New England clergyman, was a good youth, as well as a shrewd one; so he resisted temptation, and fled away.
He now roamed desperately, and at random, through the town, almost ready to believe that a spell was on him, like that by which a wizard of his country had once kept three pursuers wandering, a whole winter night, within twenty paces of the cottage which they sought. The streets lay before him, strange and desolate, and the lights were extinguished in almost every house. Twice, however, little parties of men, among whom Robin distinguished individuals in outlandish attire, came hurrying along; but, though on both occasions, they paused to address him such intercourse did not at all enlighten his perplexity. They did but utter a few words in some language of which Robin knew nothing, and perceiving his inability to answer, bestowed a curse upon him in plain English and hastened away. Finally, the lad determined to knock at the door of every mansion that might appear worthy to be occupied by his kinsman, trusting that perseverance would overcome the fatality that had hitherto thwarted him. Firm in this resolve, he was passing beneath the walls of a church, which formed the corner of two streets, when, as he turned into the shade of its steeple, he encountered a bulky stranger muffled in a cloak. The man was proceeding with the speed of earnest business, but Robin planted himself full before him, holding the oak cudgel with both hands across his body as a bar to further passage.
"Halt, honest man, and answer me a question," said he, very resolutely. "Tell me, this instant, whereabouts is the dwelling of my kinsman, Major Molineux!"
"Keep your tongue between your teeth, fool, and let me pass!" said a deep, gruff voice, which Robin partly remembered. "Let me pass, or I'll strike you to the earth!"
"No, no, neighbor!" cried Robin, flourishing his cudgel, and then thrusting its larger end close to the man's muffled face. "No, no, I'm not the fool you take me for, nor do you pass till I have an answer to my question. Whereabouts is the dwelling of my kinsman, Major Molineux?"
The stranger, instead of attempting to force his passage, stepped back into the moonlight, unmuffled his face, and stared full into that of Robin.
"Watch here an hour, and Major Molineux will pass by," said he.
Nathaniel Hawthorne Online: Nathaniel Hawthorne. My Kinsman, Major Molineux

Motiv Umherirren Stadt Nathaniel Hawthorne. My Kinsman, Major Molineux
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© by Herbert Huber, Am Fröschlanger 15, 83512 Wasserburg, Germany, 12.1.2003